Quality Control

Guided by , 2024

Welcome to Quality Control (QC). During this course, you’ll learn about quality control standards and procedures for producing an online edition. You’ll explore important quality control practices that should be incorporated into your workflows in order to ensure that your edition is accurate and error-free.

  • Approx. 3 hours to complete
  • Self-paced, progress at your own speed
  • 100% Online
  • Free

This course is part of the Fundamentals Series

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Not Enrolled
Price
Free
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About this course

Welcome to Quality Control (QC). During this course, you’ll learn about quality control standards and procedures for producing an online edition. You’ll explore important quality control practices that should be incorporated into your workflows in order to ensure that your edition is accurate and error-free.

What you'll learn

  1. to document quality control procedures and practices for your edition.
  2. to apply procedures to proofread document transcriptions.
  3. to apply quality control procedures to digitization.
  4. to develop procedures to prevent and correct errors in metadata.

Course Glossary

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  • The use of descriptive, contextual, referential, or illustrative content or structure that supports the discoverability and accessibility of source materials. Annotation may take many forms (footnotes, source notes, metadata, glossaries, essays, indexes, keywords, images, maps, and more) and multiple forms of annotation may be used by a project.

  • The “supports” of any edition (other than the reading text itself) that are created for the purpose of providing additional clarifying information. Typically, this term is applied to textual and contextual notes, but it can also apply to introductions, headnotes, dictionaries, lists, indexes, and appendices as well as newer, innovative annotation types, such as data visualizations.

  • Copyediting involves revising the text of your annotations and other apparatus to ensure that your work is clear and readable and that it conforms to conventional rules of grammar. See in contrast to proofreading.

  • The process of creating a high-quality digital copy of your source material.

  • A set of guidelines that governs the digitization of material and aligns them to industry specifications.

  • The process of writing down the policy decisions that you have made in order to share them with readers and ensure that you apply them consistently.

  • The decisions practitioners make regarding how to represent source materials in their edition. Practitioners may make decisions related to the selection of materials for publication, the form and focus of transcription, the form(s) of annotation, the elements to be captured in metadata, the processes for quality control, and more. Practitioners may choose to document any or all of these decisions for use in sharing internally and/or for informing users of their edition.

  • The process of verifying the accuracy of information provided in annotation and citations.

  • The act of confirming the presentation of a text, whether transcription or annotation, immediately prior to publication by reviewing and making any necessary revisions. See in contrast to copyediting.

  • The act of reviewing editorially-produced content, like transcription or annotation, for the purpose of ensuring quality or accuracy. Practitioners may use one or more of a variety of processes for the purpose of reviewing their content, including copyediting, fact-checking, proofreading, tandem reading, and more.

  • The act of interpreting and adapting source material to create a readable form or representation of it.

  • A sequence of tasks concerning the movement of work through a stage or stages in the prepation of an edition. A practitioner may design and employ a variety of workflows to suit their needs, including cataloging or digitization workflows, a quality control or verification workflow, a publication workflow, and more.